Museum photos: 1535-40 Passion shrine sculpture (Schnuetgen Museum, Cologne)

It is rare to find three-dimensional depictions of clothing, but with this wood-sculpted shrine from 1535-40 (Lower Rhine area) we have access to a variety of angles and views of dress of the period. Depicted is the Passion of Christ, with protagonists dressed in high fashion.

I am planning to return to the Museum Schnuetgen, which is truly a treasure trove for late medieval textiles, plus so much more, and when I do I will make sure my camera’s battery does not run out midway through. As it was, the photos were taken by my usual camera and also by my phone. Fortunately the quality of the latter was better than I had feared.

Enjoy the top, back, front, side, upwards and downwards views of sculpted dress-details.

Historical dress & textile researchers’ blogs to follow

Fellow historical dress, textile and needlework researchers that I admire:

  • A stitch in time
    Katrin Kania’s blog “Togs from bogs and other dirty laundry from medieval times!” One of the best books I have ever seen/read/obtained/pawed with abandon and found incredibly useful is Katrin’s book Kleidung im Mittelalter. Materialien – Konstruktion – Nähtechnik. Ein Handbuch. German-language (thankfully I am bilingual) book about materials, sewing techniques, the development of tailoring techniques and a reconstruction of the tailoring techniques of the Middle Ages as well as a catalogue listing extant garments from 500 to 1500. With illustrations and an English summary.
  • Medieval Silkwork
    Excellent and well-researched practice-based blog by Isis Sturtewagen, a researcher at the Centre for Urban History at the University of Antwerp. She is completing a PhD on dress and fashion in the Low Countries during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, which I can’t wait to read.
  • Neulakko
    Very interesting Finnish blog (part of it in English) by a lady who researches and recreates medieval dress and textiles. Don’t be fooled by her claiming not to be a “professional historian”, her rigorous approach to research & recreation is highly recommendable.
  • Katafalk
    Stunning blog by Swedish classically trained tailor Cathrin Åhlén. She offers very well researched tutorials on a number of period clothing (focused on 14th and 16th centuries) with detailed photos. Cathrin’s sewing skills are awe-inspiring and her background of being a tailor, combined with her creative & researched approach to recreating historical dress is truly noteworthy.

Museum photos: 1549 panel of Colonel Wilhelm Froelich (Landesmuseum Zuerich)

Goodness, where did the last two months and a bit go? In a work-mad blur of the new academic year! Anyway, here are some close-up photos of the Swiss Colonel Wilhelm Froelich, who ignored Zwingli’s Reisläufer ban and went to war for the French side. This meant that he lost his status as a Zürich citizen, but in 1556 he was ennobled by the French king.

Museum info:
Tafelgemälde. Herrenporträt Wilhelm Frölich. Ganzfiguriges Bildnis mit Wappen und Oberwappen der Familie Frölich. Maler Hans Asper. Öl auf Holz, Tempera;; Rahmen: Holz. Datiert 1549. Masse: Höhe 213 cm, Breite 111 cm. (LM-8622)